GYPSY JAZZ, The Playlist

There are some types of music that create a deep connection with your spirit and you recognize them because when you hear a song, you would like to stop everything you are doing in that moment and start dancing or singing. For me, one of these types of music  is that particular style of jazz called usually Gypsy Jazz or Gypsy Swing, and many times I force my whole family to listen to these songs, that I find absolutely exciting and alive.

I’m presenting to you today a playlist that I’ve started building since a long time ago, and which is composed by the best Gypsy Jazz songs that I discovered during my endless researches on Spotify. All tracks have been picked up one by one, and I feel that the result is now very close to what I had in mind since the beginning: a breathtaking sequence of songs without a single break or drop in the rhythm.

So, let’s launch the playlist and then you can go below the widget and read something about this incredible and joyous style of music.

 

 

Gypsy Jazz (also known as Gypsy Swing or Hot Club Jazz) is a style of jazz generally accepted to have been started by the Romani guitarist Jean “Django” Reinhardt in Paris during the 1930s. Because its origins are in France, and Reinhardt was from the Manouche Roma clan, gypsy jazz is often called by the French name “Jazz Manouche” (Wikipedia)

Gypsy Swing evolved in 1930s as a blend of French Sinti culture and Afro-American hot jazz, and it also has some of its roots in other popular musics of the era. Today we can see, how new influences have sneaked in during the years to keep the style fresh. Here you have a few articles to obtain a little broader view on Jazz Partout’s music style. (Jazzpartout)

Most classic jazz manouche groups consist of a lead guitar, violin, two rhythm guitars and bass. The rhythm guitar supplies a distinct percussive rhythm called la pompe, which, in conjunction with strongly syncopated bass lines, makes a percussion section or trap set redundant. Extended improvised solos are generally performed on guitar and/or violin but clarinet and accordion are also gaining adherents. (National Geographic)


 

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